THIS WEEK ON WDIY

Tuesday, 7:00-9:00 pm, Dave Fry presents archived sets from Stan & Garnet Rogers ('77), Trout Fishing in America ('93), Bela Fleck & Tony Trischka ('93) and more.
Wednesday, 6:00-7:00 pm, Laurie Siebert's topic will be: "A fresh look at College savings 529 plans – what’s new?" Laurie will also take listener questions at 610-758-8810.
Thursday, 6:00-7:00 pm, Sally Handlon welcomes guests Santiago Rivera of SoBeCo Works and Jennifer & Gary Lader of CoWork 414 to discuss coworker trends in the work space.
Thursday at 11 pm, Bill Fox continues the Special Focus on BK&S. The Featured CD at Midnight will be "Repelen Revisited" (Manikin Records). You'll hear new music by Vanderson.

Browse the Latest WDIY Features

J.B. Reilly on Lessons with Leaders

CEO and President of City Center Investment Corporation, J.B. Reilly, joins host Laurie Siebert on this edition of Lessons with Leaders, the new quarterly feature of Lehigh Valley Discourse. They discuss Reilly's passion for building communities, and explore the partners and focus that helps make Reilly's community building happen. To date, City Center Investment Corporation has developed more than 1.4 million square feet of mixed-use space in Downtown Allentown. Reilly's career also includes...

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NPR Headlines

For most of her childhood, growing up in southeastern Pennsylvania, Kelly Zimmerman felt alone and anxious.

She despaired when her mother was depressed or working late shifts; when her parents fought nonstop; when her friends wanted to come over, and she felt too ashamed to let them see her home's buckling floor, the lack of running water.

Kelly tried to shut out those feelings, and when she was 18, a boyfriend offered her an opioid painkiller — Percocet.

Her anxiety dissolved, at least for a little while.

Plants need carbon dioxide to live. But its effects on them are complicated.

As the level of carbon dioxide in the air continues to rise because of climate change, scientists are trying to pin down how the plants we eat are being impacted.

Mounting evidence suggests that many key plants lose nutritional value at higher CO2 levels, and scientists are running experiments all over the world to try to tease out the effects.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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